Juice Loses Favor With Moms!

By: Shauna Armitage

Kids love juice. It’s always been that way. Even adults love the succulent fruit flavors (and even sometimes veggie flavors!) which is why juicing is one of the hottest new diet crazes. We simply can’t get enough of this yummy, filling drink. For adults who are throwing fresh fruits and vegetables into a blender, juice can have many nutritional benefits, but for children who are most likely drinking store-bought juices aren’t getting quite the same perks.

Most parents don’t think twice about offering their child a glass or two of apple juice a day. If you are serving 100% juice, it certainly is an option for giving your child one of her four to five servings of fruit and vegetables each day. However, to put it into perspective, experts recommend no more than 40 grams of sugar for an adult on a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet. Just one juice box of 100% juice Juicy Juice Apple Quencher has 13 grams of sugar in it—more than a quarter of an adult’s intake for the entire day! How often do you give your child a glass or box of juice? One with breakfast, lunch and dinner? This would mean her juice intake alone would match a full grown person’s recommended sugar intake—so if you are feeding your child almost anything else, she will surely be getting too much sugar on a regular basis. In many cases, giving your little one a glass of juice is akin to giving her a glass of soda.

The best way to insure that a child is getting the proper amount of fruit and vegetables is to feed her fruits and vegetables. The green ones in particular can be a hard sell for a child, so don’t stress if your little one isn’t feeling the broccoli and green beans. You’ll develop strategies over time (Who has the biggest “tree” (broccoli) on their plate? I bet I can eat all of the carrots on my plate before you can eat yours!) that will get your little one interested in veggies. Worse comes to worse, you can hide veggies in other food they enjoy like chicken, eggs or smoothies. Take heart in the fact that a child’s taste buds continue to change over time, so just keep offering things over and over—eventually getting her to eat vegetables won’t be such an epic struggle.

Fruits, on the other hand, are much, much easier. Children naturally gravitate to the sweet, sugary taste of fruits and the options are endless. Tomatoes, grapes, oranges and berries are all packed with a powerful punch of vitamins and antioxidants that you would find in 100% juice and tend to be fan favorites.

Encourage your child to drink water instead of juice to cut down on her daily sugar intake and offer fruits and vegetables as snacks instead of store-bought goodies. Develop little tricks that will make trying new foods less scary, and you are on your way to having a happier and healthier kid.

which is why juicing is one of the hottest new diet crazes. We simply can’t get enough of this yummy, filling drink. For adults who are throwing fresh fruits and vegetables into a blender, juice can have many nutritional benefits, but for children who are most likely drinking store-bought juices aren’t getting quite the same perks.

Most parents don’t think twice about offering their child a glass or two of apple juice a day. If you are serving 100% juice, it certainly is an option for giving your child one of her four to five servings of fruit and vegetables each day. However, to put it into perspective, experts recommend no more than 40 grams of sugar for an adult on a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet. Just one juice box of 100% juice Juicy Juice Apple Quencher has 13 grams of sugar in it—more than a quarter of an adult’s intake for the entire day! How often do you give your child a glass or box of juice? One with breakfast, lunch and dinner? This would mean her juice intake alone would match a full grown person’s recommended sugar intake—so if you are feeding your child almost anything else, she will surely be getting too much sugar on a regular basis. In many cases, giving your little one a glass of juice is akin to giving her a glass of soda.

The best way to insure that a child is getting the proper amount of fruit and vegetables is to feed her fruits and vegetables. The green ones in particular can be a hard sell for a child, so don’t stress if your little one isn’t feeling the broccoli and green beans. You’ll develop strategies over time (Who has the biggest “tree” (broccoli) on their plate? I bet I can eat all of the carrots on my plate before you can eat yours!) that will get your little one interested in veggies. Worse comes to worse, you can hide veggies in other food they enjoy like chicken, eggs or smoothies. Take heart in the fact that a child’s taste buds continue to change over time, so just keep offering things over and over—eventually getting her to eat vegetables won’t be such an epic struggle.

Fruits, on the other hand, are much, much easier. Children naturally gravitate to the sweet, sugary taste of fruits and the options are endless. Tomatoes, grapes, oranges and berries are all packed with a powerful punch of vitamins and antioxidants that you would find in 100% juice and tend to be fan favorites.

Encourage your child to drink water instead of juice to cut down on her daily sugar intake and offer fruits and vegetables as snacks instead of store-bought goodies. Develop little tricks that will make trying new foods less scary, and you are on your way to having a happier and healthier kid.